UPSTATE SC BLACK

HERITAGE RESEARCHING

 

Cemetery: Images, Histories, Inscriptions & GPS Mapping

   - Abbeville

   - Anderson

   - Greenville

   - Oconee

   - Pickens

   - South Carolina GPS Mapping Project

 

Cemetery: On-line Holdings

   - Anderson

   - Oconee

   - Pickens

 

Cemetery: Tombstone Inscriptions

   - Anderson

   - Oconee

   - Pickens

 

Cemetery: Works Progress Administration:

 

Anderson

Charleston

Greenville 

Lexington

Spartanburg

Abbeville

Chesterfield

Greenwood

Marion

Saluda

Aiken

Clarendon 

Hampton

Marlboro

Sumter

Allendale

Colleton

Horry

McCormick

Union 

Bamberg

Darlington

Kershaw 

Newberry

Williamsburg 

Beaufort

Dillon

Lancaster

Oconee

York

Berkeley

Dorchester

Laurens

Orangeburg

 

Calhoun

Florence

Lee

Richland 

 

 

Church Associations:

   - Baptist

   - Methodist

 

Genealogical Societies - Upstate:

   - Anderson

   - Greenville

   - Oconee & Pickens

 

Histories - Church:

 

 

Museums:

   - Aiken (Aiken County) (Tue-Thur-Fri, Noon-4pm)

   - Charleston (Charleston County)

   - Charleston - IAAM (Charleston County)

   - Clemson (Pickens County)

   - Seneca (Oconee County)

   - Waterboro (Colleton County)

  

Plantations & Estates:

   - Abbeville

   - Anderson

   - Greenville

   - Oconee

   - Pickens

 

Publications:

  - Google Books - African Slaves

  - Google Books - Free e-Books

  - Littlejohn Juke Joint (Clemson)

  - Upper Piemont African Life

 

Research Portals:

   - AfriGeneas

   - Ancestry Portal

   - Black SC Newspapers

   - Black Digitized Newspapers

   - Chicora Foundation

   - Cyndi's Portal  

   - Dr. Megginson's Resources

   - Our Black Ancestry 

   - SCIway Portal 

   - SC GenWeb Project

   - Emily E Vaughn's Website

   - Sonia Walker's Website

   - Sonia Walker's Database

   - What was the Jim Crow System? 

   - WPA Writer's Project

 

Searching around SC

 

Slave Buying & Selling

 

Slave Everyday Life Death

 

Slave Graves Matter

 

Slave Housing

 

Slave Narratives

 

Slave Researching

 

Slave Ships

 

Slavery

 

 

Volunteer Research Help:     

   - Robin Foster (SC)

   - Kim Wilson (Lower Anderson County only)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Webmaster: Paul Kankula-NN8NN

Established Nov-2011

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Effective: 15-Oct-2020 - PMK

     

 

 

( Unidentified American Born Enslaved Children )

African Americans (also referred to as Black Americans or Afro-Americans, and formerly as American Negroes) are citizens or residents of the United States who have at least partial ancestry from any of the native populations of Sub-Saharan Africa and are the direct descendants of Enslaved Africans within the boundaries of the present United States. Most African Americans are of West African descent. However, some immigrants from African, Caribbean, Central American or South American nations, or their descendants, may also self-identify with the term.

African-American history starts in the 16th century with African Slaves who quickly rose up against the Spanish explorer Lucas Vásquez de Ayllón and progresses to when Barack Obama was elected as the 44th and current President of the United States. Between those landmarks there were other events and issues, both resolved and ongoing, that were faced by African Americans. Some of these were slavery, reconstruction, development of the African-American community, participation in the great military conflicts of the United States, racial segregation, and the Civil Rights Movement.

A South Carolina African American History Monument chronicling the experiences of African Americans in South Carolina now stands on the grounds of the State House in Columbia. The bronze and granite sculpture was dedicated in March 2001 and includes 12 panels that depict milestones in South Carolina African American history. The monument tells a story from the beginning of enslavement to the Middle Passage to Emancipation Proclamation to the Civil Rights era to the great achievements of South Carolina’s African Americans in various professions.   (Wikipedia)

 

Typical Slave Ship

Only a few decades after the discovery of America by Europeans, demand for cheap labor to work plantations made slave-trading a profitable business. The peak time of slave ships to the Atlantic passage was between the 18th and 19th century when large plantations developed in the British colonies of North America.

In order to achieve profit, the owners of the ships divided their hulls into holds with little headroom, so they could transport as many slaves as possible. Unhygienic conditions, dehydration, dysentery and scurvy led to a high mortality rate, on average 15% and up to a third of captives. Often the ships, also known as Guineamen, transported hundreds of slaves, who were chained tightly to plank beds.

 

NOTES

  • 1860 Slave Schedule Census can not be physically found for Anderson, Chester, Chesterfield, Greenville, Horry, Kershaw, Landcaster, Laurens, Lexington, Pickens, Richland, Spartanburg, Union & York Districts. 

  • Plantation nicknames were not normally shown in the 1860 Slave Schedule Census.

  • Using plantation nicknames to locate ancestors can be difficult because the nickname of a plantation may have been changed throughout the years and because the sizeable number of large farms must have resulted in lots of duplication of plantation nicknames.

  • Plantation nicknames names, if known, will normally be listed as aka (also known as).

  • In 1860 SC had ~500 plantations of 1,000+ acres or more.  Very few of these plantation locations have been GPS location mapped.

  • It's assumed that if a plantation had over 100 enslaved workers, that there would have normally been a separate cemetery provided for the workers. 

On 9-22-1862 President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, an executive order declaring that all enslaved Africans in America shall be free from that day forth..!!!

 

Disclaimer: This Genealogy Project uses "Historically Correct Words" that

some individuals might now consider to be offensive.